Virtual meetings, the Garden in July and Plant Sales.

The Covid-19 restrictions have inevitably prevented any meetings of our club, The Black Pear Gardening Club..blackpeargc.org.uk Our family has been using Skype for keeping in touch so I decided to try and hold a trial meeting for the club with the opportunity for members to say hello, I then presented pictures from our garden with the aim to include pictures from members gardens at the next meeting. While technology can be challenging we did manage to hold the meeting.

July has been a busy month here in Our Garden@19 with the open garden visits cancelled I had been left with a large stock of plants that I had hoped to sell. We decided, with the village of Pirton, (Worcestershire), where my brother Derek lives, to hold a plant sale in memory of his wife and our late sister in law, in aid of St Richards Hospice who cared for Diana. When the plants had been made presentable for sale, a large transit type van arrived to transport all the plants the day before, ready for setting up the sale the next morning.

The sale was well supported by the village, both helping and purchasing plants along with several members of the garden club.

The video below is the one I presented at the virtual meeting, ‘Our Garden@19 in July.’ Please turn your sound up, click to full-size screen, play and enjoy.

 

The tomatoes are a bush type? ‘Maskotka’ which crop well despite their vigorous growth.

Are you using technology to keep in touch?

April Top Ten.

A quick tour around Our Garden@19 to capture my Top Ten, joining Chloris at The Blooming Garden.

The White and Green garden, Lunaria annua ‘Alba’ and Tulip ‘Spring Green’.

Lunaria annua ‘Rosemary Verey’ and Cytisus ‘Golden Cascade’

Cytisus praecox Albus

Clematis alp. ‘ Broughton Bride ‘

Primulas

The Lego inspired Bug Hotel with Roof Garden.

Tulip ‘Angelique’ and violas.

You can see more April Top Ten by visiting The Blooming Garden

Do you have a favourite or a top ten of your own?

Ten Top for November.

I am joining Chloris and her many followers in posting my Top Ten for November, please visit The Blooming Garden to see what their Top Ten are.

Number one, the seed heads of the Lunaria, which provides a silvery shine in the low November sunlight. This plant provides interest through out the whole year, from the young leaves with their maroon spots, the dark purple flowers and now the seed heads.

Lunaria annua ‘Rosemary Verey’

…growing in front is a young Cotinus, we lost a mature one a few years ago, therefore we are looking forward to this one developing and flowering in the future.

Cotinus ‘Royal Purple’.

These two ‘Grasses’ make a striking feature at the end of the pebble river in the Oriental Garden. I originally saw this plant combination when visiting The Bressingham Gardens, Nr Diss, Norfolk.

Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’, hakone grass and Opheapogon Nigrescens, black mondo grass.

This Viburnum, in the White and Green Garden, is one of the earliest flowering shrubs in the garden. It flowers from early autumn through to late spring, and looks particularly good when there is a blue sky behind it.

Viburnum f ‘candidissimum’

Anna from the The Greentapestry was recently singing the praises of this rose, mentioning that it flowers from July to November.

Rosa ‘The Fairy’

Here it is in the Iris bed on the south side of the house…

Rosa ‘The Fairy’

…along with ‘ ‘Geoff Hamilton’, I am hoping this bud will open.

Rosa ‘Geoff Hamilton’

I will always have Viola’s in the garden, whether it’s the diminutive ‘Heartsease’ which I  grow from seed, (it does also self seed), or ones purchased from garden centres to provide colour through out winter.

Viola ‘Heartsease’

We were given two Clivia three years ago, one flowered the first year, none the next year and one, (yippie!) so far this year.

Clivia.

I am not sure if Number ten qualifies for a November favourite, although it is one of mine and it is in the garden. The first sighting, today, of the female Blackcap on the bird feeders. I always like to see the arrival of this aggressive little bird, she always arrives before the male and tries to defend the feeders from all comers. the down side is that it heralds the arrival of winter weather, ‘Up North’ which will eventually make its way here. 

This is a picture from 2014, they are quite nervous and therefore difficult to photograph. You can see more ‘Birdie” pictures by clicking the Wildlife Category.

That is my Top Ten in Our Garden@ 19, for November, I wonder what will be around for December?

 

 

 

Wordless Wednesday 19/7/2017. The lighter side.

Dahlia ‘Blanc y Verde’.

Petunia.

Acer negundo Flamingo

Rose ‘William and Catherine’.

Shasta daisy. Chrysanthemum x superbum.

Lychnis Coronaria alba.

Viola cornuta alba.

Astrantia major.

Lysimachia clethroides (Swan neck).

Dianthus barbatus alba (Sweet William).

Dahlia ‘Twynings After Eight’.

Daucus carota

Pelargonium Scented leaved ‘Fringed Apple’.

Pelargonium Regal ‘Richie’

Myrtus Communis and a Bumble Bee.