About.

Welcome to brimfields.com, thank you for visiting.

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This is my new blog covering interests in The Life of Brian, gardening, photography and some music.

I recently started to develop a blog about my photography along-side my other blog Our Garden@19, which I first published two years ago. These two have now been merged into brimfields.com

The pages, Gardening and Photography, explain more about these interests and my level of “Expertise”.

Photography has always interested me, (I think it was the lifestyle of Patrick Lichfield that appealed to me!) I began to develop my interest in visiting gardens as a member of the Black Pear Gardening Club and privately. These visits provide pictures I can use on the club website, my original blog Our Garden@19 and in my gardening presentations.
In this, I have received great encouragement from the gardening club’s Webmaster, Douglas Gregor, who is an excellent wildlife photographer. Please visit his website Here

This is one of my favourite photographs, posted in Raindrops under Plantlife.

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I have always gardened to some extent. When growing up, my parents and grandparents, who lived next door, both had a large traditional garden with vegetables, flowers, orchard, chickens and bees. From an early age, my brother and I were given a small plot to look after and I still remember my pleasure when my nasturtiums, covered with flowers, spread everywhere.

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My family is the most important feature in The Life of Brian. Irene and I have two daughters and two granddaughters. You can read more about them on the Garden page under The Garden Team.

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See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil.
The birds that visit our garden give an extra source of pleasure and if you are lucky a photographic opportunity.

This is my favourite wildlife picture so far, posted in feeding time under wildlife.

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I originally trained and worked in agriculture, specialising in Dairy Herd Management.

Idover Tipsy Champion Heifer in milk Wiltshire 1986

When I retired, I worked as a Freelance Gardener for a few select clients, (i.e. desperate), now retired.
I am a founder member of the Black Pear Gardening Club, group co-ordinator for the Hanley Swan NGS open gardens and county social media volunteer for the Worcestershire NGS. I love wildlife (except slugs), enjoy Jazz, Red wine Rioja (if your asking), Lapsang Souchong tea, (Ditto) Photography, Gardening and Yoga ( It helps with balance especially after the Rioja! )

I hope you enjoy reading brimfields.com please leave comments, one of the joys of blogging is the communication you have with fellow bloggers. I will reply as soon as I can.

Email Brian: skeysbrian@gmail.com

One thought on “About.

  1. Besides the roses, you got white campion and California poppy in both natural orange and white or cream! California poppy seems to be popular everywhere. However, as much as I like white, and the white campion, California poppy is at its best in natural bright orange. There are so many better white flowers. In Europe or England, is anyone aware that California poppy are naturally bright orange or gold? I mean, do white (cream), yellow, red, purple (lavender) and all the other colors besides orange and gold seem to be ‘normal’ colors for them? I have considered trying a white (cream) variety, just to experience it, and just might try a mix (!) with the hopes of experiencing a few odd colors. It is not easy for me though, since California poppy is SO traditional. When I was a kid, finding an extremely rare white poppy was like finding a four leaf clover is for other kids. Purple (lavender) poppies were even more rare. I happened to find BOTH, but only once. Regardless of what any literature will tell you, almost all California poppies are orange in the wild. Large but relatively sparse swaths of yellow poppies bloom in the Mojave Desert, but their seed somehow grows into plants that bloom mostly orange in other regions, as if the yellow color is a response to the environment. (I believe it to be genetic though.) A few gold poppies are blooming on the roadside outside right now, but they are smaller and not as spectacular as the orange poppies.

    Like

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