Vinca.

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Vinca have a bad reputation with gardeners as being very invasive. This is more true of ‘major’, the smaller ‘minor’, known as the Lesser Periwinkle is, I think, an excellent plant for dry, shady areas. It is not often considered for planters, although it can look particularly good in urns or large pots, trailing over the sides like a green waterfall.

Available in colours other than blue, it can be a garden worthy plant.

The double blue, grows in ourgarden@19 in urns either side of the banana bench.

Vinca minor ‘Azurea Flore Pleno’

An attractive alternative is the purple form, here in a large terracotta pot.

Vinca minor ‘Atropurpurea’

A white one lives happily in a small Cotswold Stone pot in the White and Green garden.

Vinca minor ‘Alba’

The star of our Vinca family is ‘Jenny Pym’ with its delicate pink and white colours…

Vinca diffopmis ‘Jenny Pym’

…scrambling through our Spring Bed…

…does pink and yellow go together?

‘Brazen Hussy’.

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The plant family, Ranunculus, includes buttercups and lesser celandine, plants that most gardeners would not welcome into their garden. However with these looks and the name of ‘Brazen Hussy’, I have made an exception.

Ranunculus ‘Brazen Hussy’

It was discovered and named by Christopher Lloyd growing in the woods at Great Dixter.

Here, enjoying the sunshine, it has brazenly self seeded into some cracks in the path. What is being ‘Brazen’ in your garden?

Bulbs, Sunshine, Tea and Cake.

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The churchyard at Birlingham, Nr Pershore in Worcestershire has long been a pilgrimage for snowdrop lovers in the area. Bulb Teas are held each Saturday and Sunday in February until Sunday 24th February in the Village Hall from 11.00am to 4.00 pm.

The Grade II listed church of St James with its 15C tower, which at one time contained a dovecote, sits in the middle of the village by a small green, with the old school, now a private house, and the village hall.

We visited on Sunday, in glorious sunshine, and with the snowdrops starting to go over, crocus and cyclamen were taking their place.

A Cherry tree just outside the church wall was in full flower with honey bees taking advantage of the  sunshine to gather nectar.

 A colony of bees have made their home in the tower…

In this hole under the old clock face.

The church was open and had been decorated with flower arrangements.

The teas and cakes were proving to be very popular on this beautiful afternoon in this charming Worcestershire village.