April Top Ten.

A quick tour around Our Garden@19 to capture my Top Ten, joining Chloris at The Blooming Garden.
The White and Green garden, Lunaria annua ‘Alba’ and Tulip ‘Spring Green’.
Lunaria annua ‘Rosemary Verey’ and Cytisus ‘Golden Cascade’
Cytisus praecox Albus
Clematis alp. ‘ Broughton Bride ‘
Primulas

The Lego inspired Bug Hotel with Roof Garden.
Tulip ‘Angelique’ and violas.

You can see more April Top Ten by visiting The Blooming Garden

Do you have a favourite or a top ten of your own?

‘Brazen Hussy’.

The plant family, Ranunculus, includes buttercups and lesser celandine, plants that most gardeners would not welcome into their garden. However with these looks and the name of ‘Brazen Hussy’, I have made an exception.

Ranunculus ‘Brazen Hussy’

It was discovered and named by Christopher Lloyd growing in the woods at Great Dixter.

Here, enjoying the sunshine, it has brazenly self seeded into some cracks in the path. What is being ‘Brazen’ in your garden?

Chris, Camassia & Chaos.

Our gardening club, The Black Pear Gardening Club, meets monthly, with speakers during the winter months and garden visits during the summer.

For the February meeting we welcomed Stella Exley from Hare Spring Cottage Plants, York.

The Title of her talk was ‘Chris, Camassia and Chaos’.

Stella regaled us with accounts of the trials and tribulations she went through to provide camassia to Chris Beardshaw for his RHS Chelsea gold medal winning garden in 2015.

It started with a chance meeting at Arley Hall show, following which Chris contacted Stella, to arrange a visit to her nursery.  She holds the national collection of camassia and grows other hardy perennials.

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He showed Stella his plans for the show garden and she agreed to grow 2000 camassia, individually in pots, to provide the 1000 that he needed.
In order to do this she decided to actually grow 4000, this was on top of the 10,000 that she normally grew, nearly all single handed!

All her plants are grown outside on the floor with only a small poly tunnel and greenhouse to work in. That winter they were ‘blessed’ with two periods of snow which held back the development of the camassia. With her experience of growing them she knew they could not be forced on under cover, even if she had the facilities to do so.
The decision was made to rotate them in and out of the poly tunnel, for only two hours during the day and four hours at night, which she did wearing a head torch. She then started to feed them carefully with liquid feed so as not to scorch the leaves.

Chris visited the nursery to see the camassia in flower for the first time just before the show.camassia-gallery-about-gallery-07

Delighted with what he saw he asked Stella to choose the ones that would go on to the lorry for the garden. To make it more difficult they had to be transported trailer at a time down the narrow track to the waiting artic lorry.

Stella ended by showing us pictures of the gold medal winning garden.

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Following a question and answer session, she was busy selling some of the many pots of camassia she had brought with her all the way from North Yorkshire.
There was general agreement that this was one of the most interesting talks we have had.

Stella and the pots of Camassia she brought for sale at the meeting.

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I succumbed to the ‘Charms’ of Camassia leichtlinii ‘Sacajawea’ for our Green and white garden. It has ivory white flowers with variegated foliage.

You can visit Stella’s website: Hare Spring Cottage Plants.

The website for the Black Pear gardening Club: BPGC

Do you grow camassia?

Unless indicated otherwise all pictures are published with Stella Exley’s permission.

New Year – New Blog.

Welcome to brimfields.com, thank you for visiting.

This is my new blog covering two interests in The Life of Brian, photography and gardening.100_2008

I recently started to develop a blog about my photography alongside my other blog Our Garden@19, which I first published two years ago. These two have now been merged into brimfields.com

The pages, Photography and Gardening, explain more about these interests and my level of “Expertise”.

Photography has always interested me (I think it was the lifestyle of Patrick Lichfield that appealed to me!) I begVersion 2an to develop my interest in visiting gardens as a member of the Black Pear Gardening Club and privately. These visits provide pictures I can use on the club website, my original blog Our Garden@19 and in my gardening presentations.
In this I have received great encouragement from the gardening club’s Webmaster, Douglas Gregor, who is an excellent wildlife photograph. Please visit his website Here

 

This is one of my favourite photographs, posted in Raindrops under Plant life.

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I have always gardened to some extent. When growing up, my parents and Grandparents, who lived next door, both had a large traditional garden with vegetables, flowers, orchard, chickens and bees. From an early age my brother and I were given a small plot to look after and I still remember my pleasure when my nasturtiums, covered with flowers, spread every where.

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My family are the most important feature in The Life of Brian. Irene and I have two daughters and two granddaughters. You can read more about them in the Garden page under The Garden Team.

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See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil.

The birds that visit our garden provide an extra source of pleasure and if you are lucky a photographic opportunity. This is my favourite wildlife picture so far, posted in feeding time under wildlife.

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I hope you enjoy reading brimfields.com please leave comments, one of the joys of blogging is the communication with fellow bloggers. I will reply as soon as I can.